My Best and Worst Reads of 2017

In 2017 I made a concerted effort to read more books, even though I was at university and couldn’t read as much as I wanted. According to Goodreads, I managed 19 books – nothing for some, but impressive for me – some of which were AMAZING, some of which were, well, just okay, and some of which I really wasn’t a fan of. So, even though it’s a couple of months overdue, here are my favourite and least favourite reads of 2017!
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The Wise Man’s Fear, Kingkiller Chronicles 2: Book Review

The Wise Man’s Fear is the second installment in Patrick Rothfuss’ bestselling Kingkiller Chronicles. This is the second day of Kvothe telling his life story, covering a shorter time period than the first book, The Name Of The Wind (you can find my review of it here) – only a year or two – during Kvothe’s time at the University and his break from studying in which he travels, and yet it is longer than the first book – almost a thousand pages long.

I simply had to pick up this book as soon as I finished The Name Of The Wind – the first book leaves us with many unanswered questions.

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The Name Of The Wind, The Kingkiller Chronicles 1: Book Review

The Name Of The Wind is the first book of Patrick Rothfuss' unique and ambitious high fantasy series, The Kingkiller Chronicle. Is it any good? Hell yes! Should you read it? Definitely! Read more to find out why...The Name Of The Wind is the first book in Patrick Rothfuss’ bestselling fantasy series, The Kingkiller Chronicles. Amazingly, The Name Of The Wind is Rothfuss’ debut, and the series has reached critical acclaim without even being finished yet.

This book is a little different to most fantasy books: rather than follow some powerful hero on an epic and noble quest, we meet simple innkeeper Kote, who does not turn out to be the chosen one destined to save the world. However, he does turn out to be Kvothe, killer of kings and feature of many myths and rumours. Dismayed though he is to have been discovered in the remote part of the world he has chosen to hide in, he is persuaded to tell his life story, and finally reveal the truth behind all the far-fetched stories about him.

In The Name Of The Wind, Kvothe tells of his childhood in a performing troupe, of his time at the famed University, and of the beginning of his search for the fearsome magical creatures known as the Chandrian, hinting all the while at the grand and infamous future that is to come.

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