The Slow Regard Of Silent Things, Kingkiller Chronicle 2.5: Book Review

The Slow Regard Of Silent Things by Patrick Rothfuss is a companion novella to Rothfuss’ bestselling Kingkiller Chronicle. It follows Auri, a strange girl who lives under the University, who Kvothe, the protagonist of the Kingkiller Chronicle, meets during the first book of the series. If you haven’t read my reviews for the first two books in the series, The Name Of The Wind and The Wise Man’s Fear, here and here. Continue reading “The Slow Regard Of Silent Things, Kingkiller Chronicle 2.5: Book Review”

The Wise Man’s Fear, Kingkiller Chronicles 2: Book Review

The Wise Man’s Fear is the second installment in Patrick Rothfuss’ bestselling Kingkiller Chronicles. This is the second day of Kvothe telling his life story, covering a shorter time period than the first book, The Name Of The Wind (you can find my review of it here) – only a year or two – during Kvothe’s time at the University and his break from studying in which he travels, and yet it is longer than the first book – almost a thousand pages long.

I simply had to pick up this book as soon as I finished The Name Of The Wind – the first book leaves us with many unanswered questions.

Continue reading “The Wise Man’s Fear, Kingkiller Chronicles 2: Book Review”

The Well of Ascension, Mistborn 2: Book Review

Well of Ascension Book ReviewThe Well of Ascension is the second book in Brandon Sanderson’s bestselling fantasy series, the Mistborn trilogy. The books are set in the Final Empire: populated by nobles, magic users called Allomancers (many of whom are Mistings – only able to use one Allomantic power – some of whom are Mistborn – able to use all the Allomantic powers – but all of whom have noble blood), and the low-class skaa; led by the immortal, godlike, and oppressive Lord Ruler. The first book, The Final Empire, followed powerful Mistborn Kelsier, the leader of a thieving crew, and newest recruit Vin, an untrained Mistborn, as the crew take on their most ambitious project yet: killing the Lord Ruler. Unsurprisingly, The Well Of Ascension chronicles the aftermath of the crew’s attempts: Vin, now even more powerful than Kelsier, and the remainder of the crew must deal not only with chaos, but also the return of forces a thousand years gone. Continue reading “The Well of Ascension, Mistborn 2: Book Review”

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