My Favourite Reads of 2018

It’s the end of another year; a time to reflect and reminisce. 2018 has been a big year for me: I graduated university and started my first full time job, so it’s been pretty busy. Amongst all that, though, I also found time to read some fantastic books. And so, in the true spirit of reflecting and reminiscing, here’s a countdown of my favourites and my thoughts on each!

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Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine: Book Review

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine is Gail Honeyman’s debut novel, published in 2017. The story follows the eponymous Eleanor, a thirty-year old woman who lives alone and works in an office. She eats the same meals every day, has a phone call with her judgemental mother at the same time every Wednesday, and spends her weekends drinking vodka to avoid thoughts of her past. People often find her difficult to get on with, but Eleanor doesn’t mind: she prides herself on her independence. When she spots a handsome singer at a gig, she becomes convinced they are destined to fall in love. But as she prepares herself to meet and pursue him, she and a new coworker called Raymond witness an old man fall on the street, and feel obliged to help him. Suddenly, Eleanor finds herself in the social world she has been an outsider to for so long. Will she learn to cope, or will she return to her old ways? And will she learn to deal with her past?

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Tower Of Dawn Book Review

 

img_20180604_194738_7871865508129.jpgTower of Dawn is the sixth book in Sarah J Maas’s young adult fantasy series Throne of Glass. Originally intended to be a companion novella to the series, this book follows former Captain of Adarlan’s Guard, now Hand to the King, Chaol Westfall, as he and the new Captain of the Guard, Nesryn Faliq, journey to the Southern Continent in the hopes of gaining the alliance of the Southern Continent – and of healing Chaol’s injury to his spine.

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My Best and Worst Reads of 2017

In 2017 I made a concerted effort to read more books, even though I was at university and couldn’t read as much as I wanted. According to Goodreads, I managed 19 books – nothing for some, but impressive for me – some of which were AMAZING, some of which were, well, just okay, and some of which I really wasn’t a fan of. So, even though it’s a couple of months overdue, here are my favourite and least favourite reads of 2017!
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Jane, Unlimited: Book Review

20171128_121946 (1)Jane, Unlimited by Kristin Cashore is a mix between a standalone novel and a collection of short stories, which Cashore describes as something resembling a choose-your-own-adventure story. It follows the title character, Jane, as she follows her late Aunt Magnolia’s advice to go to Tu Reviens, a mysterious grand house on its own island, if ever she gets the chance. The book is split into six sections: Tu Reviens, which introduces the characters and the situation, and five short stories, each in their own genres, and which each follow Jane as she makes a particular choice. The stories are, however, designed to be read in the order, as they do have a plot arc between them.

I picked up Jane, Unlimited because Cashore is one of my favourite authors: I loved all of her previous books, Graceling, Fire, and Bitterblue, which are all standalone but related fantasy novels. So I knew that, even though it’s completely different, I would love Jane, Unlimited too.

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The Lies of Locke Lamora, The Gentleman Bastard Sequence 1: Book Review

The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch is the first in the Gentleman Bastard sequence, a seven-book fantasy series following expert con-artist Locke Lamora (aka the Thorn of Camorr) as he and his gang, the Gentlemen Bastards, perform intricate tricks on the unsuspecting nobility of the ancient city of Camorr to get their money from them. But a war in Camorr’s lively underworld – and the fact that someone powerful is now close on the Thorn’s tail – threatens to pull all their plans apart in the most unexpected of ways. Continue reading “The Lies of Locke Lamora, The Gentleman Bastard Sequence 1: Book Review”

Mid-Year Book Freakout Tag

This isn’t the sort of thing I’ve done before – which makes it quite exciting! This is a tag I saw on the Bookavid’s blog and thought, “hey, that looks fun, maybe I’ll give it a go!” It’s basically just a low-down what I’ve read so far in 2017.

For every book I’ve mentioned, I’ve linked either to my review of it or to the Goodreads page if I haven’t reviewed it.

So, let’s get on with it!
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The Hero of Ages, Mistborn 3: Book Review

20170718_114458The Hero of Ages is the third and final installment in Brandon Sanderson’s epic fantasy, the Mistborn trilogy. This book follows Vin and the crew as they attempt to stave off the end of the world, and brings together loose ends regarding the prophecies of the Hero of Ages, the power Vin found at the Well of Ascension, and the mysteries of what the Lord Ruler did and why. It’s a stunning conclusion involving magic, magical creatures, and gods. The only thing that could possibly make this fantasy any more fantastical is dragons.

You can find my review of Book One, The Final Empire, here, and my review of Book Two, The Well of Ascension, here. In this post, I’ll discuss my thoughts not only on The Hero of Ages as a single book, but as the Mistborn trilogy as a whole.

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The Well of Ascension, Mistborn 2: Book Review

Well of Ascension Book ReviewThe Well of Ascension is the second book in Brandon Sanderson’s bestselling fantasy series, the Mistborn trilogy. The books are set in the Final Empire: populated by nobles, magic users called Allomancers (many of whom are Mistings – only able to use one Allomantic power – some of whom are Mistborn – able to use all the Allomantic powers – but all of whom have noble blood), and the low-class skaa; led by the immortal, godlike, and oppressive Lord Ruler. The first book, The Final Empire, followed powerful Mistborn Kelsier, the leader of a thieving crew, and newest recruit Vin, an untrained Mistborn, as the crew take on their most ambitious project yet: killing the Lord Ruler. Unsurprisingly, The Well Of Ascension chronicles the aftermath of the crew’s attempts: Vin, now even more powerful than Kelsier, and the remainder of the crew must deal not only with chaos, but also the return of forces a thousand years gone. Continue reading “The Well of Ascension, Mistborn 2: Book Review”

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