The Clockmaker’s Daughter: Book Review

While my genre of choice is usually fantasy, one of my favourite non-fantasy authors is historical mystery writer Kate Morton. All her books are must-reads for me, and her newest novel The Clockmaker’s Daughter was no exception. It has been out for over a year now, and I have already owned a copy for several months, but I finally got round to reading it recently! I was incredibly excited about this book, as it sounded even more mysterious than her previous books, and I do love a good mystery!

The story of The Clockmaker’s Daughter revolves around the scandalous events of a group of young artists’ summer in an English manor house in 1892, resulting in murder, burglary, vanishing, and the early end of a promising career. Over a hundred years later, in 2017, archivist Elodie finds a sketchbook and a photograph from this summer and is drawn to investigate the mystery, and the connections between its players and the prominent Victorian activist whose archives she keeps – as well as between the alluring manor house and her own family. Told from multiple perspectives over one hundred and fifty years and several generations, The Clockmaker’s Daughter is a complex story of secrets and lies, of love and family, of stories and history – and a little bit of the supernatural…

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My Favourite Reads of 2018

It’s the end of another year; a time to reflect and reminisce. 2018 has been a big year for me: I graduated university and started my first full time job, so it’s been pretty busy. Amongst all that, though, I also found time to read some fantastic books. And so, in the true spirit of reflecting and reminiscing, here’s a countdown of my favourites and my thoughts on each!

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Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine: Book Review

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine is Gail Honeyman’s debut novel, published in 2017. The story follows the eponymous Eleanor, a thirty-year old woman who lives alone and works in an office. She eats the same meals every day, has a phone call with her judgemental mother at the same time every Wednesday, and spends her weekends drinking vodka to avoid thoughts of her past. People often find her difficult to get on with, but Eleanor doesn’t mind: she prides herself on her independence. When she spots a handsome singer at a gig, she becomes convinced they are destined to fall in love. But as she prepares herself to meet and pursue him, she and a new coworker called Raymond witness an old man fall on the street, and feel obliged to help him. Suddenly, Eleanor finds herself in the social world she has been an outsider to for so long. Will she learn to cope, or will she return to her old ways? And will she learn to deal with her past?

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The Star-Touched Queen: Book Review

The Star-Touched Queen by Roshani Chokshi is a young adult fantasy novel inspired by Indian mythology. The first in a duology, this book follows Maya, a princess who is spurned for the damning horoscope she was given at birth, as she is forced into an arranged marriage intended to end the war. But in the middle of the wedding, fighting breaks out, and one of Maya’s suitors, Amar, whisks her away to his kingdom, which she has never heard of, via the Otherworld, which Maya had always believed to be fictional. Bound by magic, Amar is unable to give her any answers to her questions about himself or his kingdom. And so Maya finds herself Queen of a kingdom she knows nothing about, married to a charming but mysterious husband, and cooped up in a strange, magical castle. As she counts down the days until Amar can finally reveal all his secrets to her, Maya hears a voice singing and calling to her from a foreboding door which isn’t always there. Despite the warnings, Maya feels drawn to investigate.

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Tower Of Dawn Book Review

 

img_20180604_194738_7871865508129.jpgTower of Dawn is the sixth book in Sarah J Maas’s young adult fantasy series Throne of Glass. Originally intended to be a companion novella to the series, this book follows former Captain of Adarlan’s Guard, now Hand to the King, Chaol Westfall, as he and the new Captain of the Guard, Nesryn Faliq, journey to the Southern Continent in the hopes of gaining the alliance of the Southern Continent – and of healing Chaol’s injury to his spine.

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The Slow Regard Of Silent Things, Kingkiller Chronicle 2.5: Book Review

The Slow Regard Of Silent Things by Patrick Rothfuss is a companion novella to Rothfuss’ bestselling Kingkiller Chronicle. It follows Auri, a strange girl who lives under the University, who Kvothe, the protagonist of the Kingkiller Chronicle, meets during the first book of the series. If you haven’t read my reviews for the first two books in the series, The Name Of The Wind and The Wise Man’s Fear, here and here. Continue reading “The Slow Regard Of Silent Things, Kingkiller Chronicle 2.5: Book Review”

The Wise Man’s Fear, Kingkiller Chronicles 2: Book Review

The Wise Man’s Fear is the second installment in Patrick Rothfuss’ bestselling Kingkiller Chronicles. This is the second day of Kvothe telling his life story, covering a shorter time period than the first book, The Name Of The Wind (you can find my review of it here) – only a year or two – during Kvothe’s time at the University and his break from studying in which he travels, and yet it is longer than the first book – almost a thousand pages long.

I simply had to pick up this book as soon as I finished The Name Of The Wind – the first book leaves us with many unanswered questions.

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The Name Of The Wind, The Kingkiller Chronicles 1: Book Review

The Name Of The Wind is the first book of Patrick Rothfuss' unique and ambitious high fantasy series, The Kingkiller Chronicle. Is it any good? Hell yes! Should you read it? Definitely! Read more to find out why...The Name Of The Wind is the first book in Patrick Rothfuss’ bestselling fantasy series, The Kingkiller Chronicles. Amazingly, The Name Of The Wind is Rothfuss’ debut, and the series has reached critical acclaim without even being finished yet.

This book is a little different to most fantasy books: rather than follow some powerful hero on an epic and noble quest, we meet simple innkeeper Kote, who does not turn out to be the chosen one destined to save the world. However, he does turn out to be Kvothe, killer of kings and feature of many myths and rumours. Dismayed though he is to have been discovered in the remote part of the world he has chosen to hide in, he is persuaded to tell his life story, and finally reveal the truth behind all the far-fetched stories about him.

In The Name Of The Wind, Kvothe tells of his childhood in a performing troupe, of his time at the famed University, and of the beginning of his search for the fearsome magical creatures known as the Chandrian, hinting all the while at the grand and infamous future that is to come.

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The Lies of Locke Lamora, The Gentleman Bastard Sequence 1: Book Review

The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch is the first in the Gentleman Bastard sequence, a seven-book fantasy series following expert con-artist Locke Lamora (aka the Thorn of Camorr) as he and his gang, the Gentlemen Bastards, perform intricate tricks on the unsuspecting nobility of the ancient city of Camorr to get their money from them. But a war in Camorr’s lively underworld – and the fact that someone powerful is now close on the Thorn’s tail – threatens to pull all their plans apart in the most unexpected of ways. Continue reading “The Lies of Locke Lamora, The Gentleman Bastard Sequence 1: Book Review”

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